Affiliated Scientists and Staff

An, Li Biggs, Trent Bohonak, Andrew Clark, Rulon
Crooks, Jeff Deutschman, Douglas Farley, Kathleen Gersberg, Richard
Hoh, Eunha James, Kelsey Jennings, Megan Jankowski, Piotr
Lewison, Rebecca Marnocha, Erin Marschalek, Dan McIntyre, Patrick
O’Leary, John Stow, Doug Strahm, Spring Tredick, Catherine

Li An
Li An
Li An is Associate Professor at Department of Geography and Adjunct Professor at Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences (RCEES), Chinese Academy of Sciences. He received his B.S from Peking University in 1989, M.S. from Chinese Academy of Sciences (Systems Ecology; 1992) and Michigan State University (Statistics; 2002), and Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 2003. With research interests in space-time analysis and landscape modeling, GeoComputation, landscape ecology, and complexity theory, An published his research in prestigious journals such as Annals of Association of American Geographers (flagship journal in geography), Ecological Modeling, Ecological Economics, and Science. He was the recipient of the 2006 Outstanding Paper in Landscape Ecology from the USA Chapter of the International Association of Landscape Ecologists. His research projects range from local to global (e.g., Nepal, Ghana, USA, and China) scales. An has recently established a research-education-outreach partnership with RCEES of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve (China), and the Zoological Society of San Diego. His research projects have been reported by SDSU Website (front page) and The 360 Magazine (The Magazine of San Diego State University). His service at SDSU includes paper reviews for journals in geography and related disciplines, grant proposal reviews for federal agencies such as NSF, and mentoring of Ph.D. students and M.S./M.A. students
lan@mail.sdsu.edu
http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~lian/projects.html
Trent Biggs
Trent Biggs
Dr. Biggs examines the impacts of land use on watershed processes. His projects include assessing the impact of urbanization on erosion in Tijuana, the effect of irrigation on climate and downstream water scarcity in India, and the impact of climate change on high altitude wetlands in the Himalaya. He has supervised students doing research on snowmelt runoff production in the Sierra Nevada, copper contamination in San Diego marinas, and sedimentation rates in the Tijuana Estuary.
tbiggs@mail.sdsu.edu
http://geography.sdsu.edu/People/Faculty/biggs.html
Andrew Bohonak
Andrew Bohonak
Dr. Bohonak is an Associate Professor, Director of Undergraduate Advising and Curriculum, and Vice Chair in the Department of Biology. His taxonomic specialty is freshwater crustaceans and insects, and he has conducted research on the endangered San Diego fairy shrimp. He has collaborated with Dr. Ellen Bauder on a guidebook for rapid assessment of vernal pools in San Diego County. He also has expertise in evolutionary biology and population genetics, and has studied patterns of genetic variation in numerous species that are of concern for conservation or management. He has worked with local consulting firms, the City of San Diego, and USFWS on a number of projects related to vernal pools. He serves as a scientific advisor to the San Diego Tracking Team.
bohonak@sciences.sdsu.edu
http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/pub/andy/
Rulon Clark
Rulon Clark
Dr. Clark's primary interests are in understanding how the behavior of individual animals mediate population and community processes. This work is often done in the context of conservation and management of threatened species. His current projects include examining the impacts of habitat fragmentation by human developments on the movement, dispersal, diversity, and connectedness of a suite of terrestrial animal species in the San Diego area (primarily amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals). He uses a combination of ecological monitoring, behavioral research, molecular genetics, and stable isotope analysis to examine ecological and behavioral processes in these communities. Graduate students in Dr. Clark' laboratory work on similar issues, including the conservation of the San Diego fairy shrimp (Branchinecta sandiegonensis), and the management and reintroduction of the endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa).
rclark@sciences.sdsu.edu
http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/pub/clark/Site/Home.html
Jeff Crooks
Jeff Crooks
Jeff Crooks has been working in San Diego' coastal environments for over 20 years, first as a graduate student and currently as the Research Coordinator of the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (TRNERR). Dr. Crooks work has focused on human-induced changes to the region' bays and estuaries, as well as restoration of these vital ecosystems. A central problem in trying to understand, protect, and restore natural ecosystems is the realization that many changes in these areas tend to go unnoticed. This results in the phenomenon of "shifting baselines," where expectations of nature are progressively lowered. One way to counter this process is to learn as much as we can about ecosystems of the past, and the TRNERR research program has been examining the historical ecology of our coastal wetlands. Implementing long-term monitoring also helps counteract the shifting of baselines. To that end, Dr. Crooks currently leads a program that tracks short-term variability and long-term change in both physical and biological properties in several coastal wetlands (including the TRNERR, South San Diego Bay, and Los Penasquitos Lagoon). Data gathered from monitoring and research also can be coupled with management efforts in order to learn lessons and improve the efficacy of these actions. The TRNERR adaptive management program focuses on the ecology and control of invasive species, as well as reconstruction and restoration of coastal salt marshes.
jcrooks@trnerr.org
http://trnerr.org/
Douglas Deutschman
Douglas Deutschman
Dr. Deutschman is a Professor of Biology and a Member of the University Senate as well as Associate Director of the IEMM. He is a Mathematical Ecologist who works on the application of advanced mathematical, statistical and computational techniques to complex questions in ecology. His quantitative training in statistics and computational science supports two kinds of research. One area concentrates on fundamental questions in mathematical ecology e.g. population dynamics, scaling, global climate change, and biodiversity. A second is aimed at bridging the gap between traditional statistical sampling theory and the design of ecological monitoring programs. His work blends theory and data, field experiments and statistical modeling, as well as the development and analysis of computer simulation models of biological communities. His recent research focuses on a variety of organisms and systems including modeling the restoration of native shrub lands, predicting the fate of southern California' chaparral, and population dynamics of endangered passerines. His extensive statistical training and experience provides him with the opportunity to collaborate on a variety of projects across the university.
ddeutschman@sciences.sdsu.edu
http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/faculty/dhd/public/index.htm
Kathleen Farley
Kathleen Farley
Dr. Farley is an assistant professor in the Geography department at SDSU, and has previous experience working for two conservation organizations, The Nature Conservancy in California and EcoCiencia in Ecuador. She is particularly interested in the ecological, socio-economic, and policy aspects of Payment for Ecosystem Services programs. Most of her research has been in South America, although recently she has been involved in projects in the Oregon Cascades and the Tijuana River Watershed. In the San Diego region, she has primarily worked on understanding the effects of Mexico’s change in agrarian policy on land ownership and ownership fragmentation in northern Baja, and is advising a graduate student working on evaluating social attitudes and environmental perceptions towards the Multiple Species Conservation Program in San Diego County.
kfarley@mail.sdsu.edu
http://geography.sdsu.edu/People/Faculty/farley.html
Richard M. Gersberg
Richard Gersberg
Dr. Richard M. Gersberg is currently a Professor (and Head of the Division) of Environmental Health in the Graduate School of Public Health at San Diego State University (SDSU). He has an M.S. degree in biology, and a Ph.D degree in microbiology from the University of California, Davis. Dr. Gersberg specializes in water quality research, and has broad experience working with both chemical and microbiological pollutants and ecological and human health risk assessments. He has over 60 scientific publications in these areas. Dr. Gersberg has conducted a number of studies on the detection, quantitation, and risk posed by pathogens and chemicals in receiving waters, estuaries and the ocean, including the Tijuana Estuary, the Venice Lagoon, Italy, and the Salton Sea, CA. He is currently the Principal Investigator of a number of water-quality related projects including: the removal and ecotoxicity of selenium in constructed wetlands in Imperial Valley, CA, the effect of sea-level rise on coastal wetland habitats and water quality in San Diego County, and a risk assessment for the consumption of fish from Imperial Beach, CA.
rgersber@mail.sdsu.edu
http://publichealth.sdsu.edu/facultydetail.php?ID=51
Eunha Hoh
Eunha Hoh
Dr. Eunha Hoh is Assistant Professor in Environmental Health Division of Graduate School of Public Health at SDSU. Dr. Eunha Hoh' research interests focus on fates of diverse environmental pollutants in the environment, identification of new emerging contaminants in the environment, and their impact on human health and ecotoxicology. Analytes of interest are known toxic organic pollutants such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as potentially toxic brominated/chlorinated flame retardants, their degradation products, and other emerging contaminants. Dr. Hoh recently developed an untargeted analytical approach for detection of a broad range of organic chemicals in environmental samples using a comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatograph with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS). She is working on further development of this untargeted analytical approach and its application towards various types of samples for environment monitoring, ecotoxicology and human health. Most of her work involves the application of chromatography and mass spectrometry.
ehoh@mail.sdsu.edu
http://publichealth.sdsu.edu/facultydetail.php?ID=277
Kelsey James
Kelsey James
Kelsey James is a research fellow with the Conservation Ecology Lab in the Biology Department. She previously worked with the Pacific Shark Research Center researching the life history characteristics of rajid skates in the eastern North Pacific. Her research interests encompass life history characters, taxonomy, fisheries, bycatch and conservation of all chondrichthyans. She is currently involved with a project with Dr. Rebecca Lewison, Dr. Jeffrey Moore Dr. Peter Dillingham, Dr. Alex Curtis and others that will gather tools to estimate the sustainability of data-deficient long-lived marine vertebrate bycatch. She is gathering bycatch and demographic data on chondrichthyans, sea turtles, seabirds and marine mammals to facilitate species-specific bycatch sustainability estimates.
kjames@projects.sdsu.edu
http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/Pub/lewison/conservation/pmwiki.php?n=Main.KelseyJames
Piotr Jankowski
Piotr Jankowski
Piotr Jankowski received M.S. in Econometrics and Operations Research from the Poznan University of Economics in 1979 and Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Washington in 1989. Before coming to San Diego State University he held faculty appointments in Geography at the University of Idaho and in Geoinformatics at Muenster University in Germany. Since 2003 he has been a professor in the Department of Geography at San Diego State University. His research focuses on Spatial Decision Support Systems, Participatory Geographic Information Systems, Spatial Optimization and Exploratory Data Analysis. He has published extensively in leading Geography and GIScience journals and has been the PI and Co-PI on a number of research projects funded by NSF, NASA, and various state agencies. Some of his past projects include: “Target Mapping System for Spatial Data Mining and Visualization”, “A Border Security Decision Support System Driven by Remotely Sensed Data Inputs”, “An Internet Platform to Support Public Participation in Transportation Decision Making”, “A study of Geographic Information Technology Use in Collaborative Water Resource Planning”. His new book “GIS for Urban and Regional Environments: A Spatial Decision Support Approach”, co-authored with Timothy Nyerges from University of Washington was recently published by Guilford Press.
pjankows@mail.sdsu.edu
http://geography.sdsu.edu/People/Faculty/jankowski.html
Megan Jennings
Megan Jennings
Dr. Jennings is a post-doctoral researcher with IEMM. She holds a B.A. in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology from Dartmouth College and received her Ph.D. in Ecology in 2013 through a joint program with San Diego State University and University of California, Davis. Her dissertation work focused on examining mammalian carnivore response to fire and shifting fire frequencies in southern California. Her research interests include applied conservation in terrestrial systems, especially landscape connectivity assessments using field, lab-based, and analytical techniques with a goal of providing research to inform land management and conservation planning. She is currently working on a project to assess current and future landscape connectivity across San Diego’s Multiple Species Conservation Plan preserve network using bobcats as an indicator species. This work combines telemetry, remote camera, roadkill, and genetic datasets to evaluate actual movement through the preserve network, and to project what future connectivity will look like given landscape changes resulting from climate change, land-use change, and shifting fire regimes.
mjennings@mail.sdsu.edu
Rebecca Lewison
Rebecca Lewison
Rebecca Lewison is an Assistant Professor in the Biology Department and serves as the Director for the IEMM. As a conservation ecologist, Dr. Lewison has research experience on a wide range of species and natural systems. Her research, grounded in conservation science and ecology, employs field, lab-based, analytical and quantitative approaches to address applied questions in resource management and conservation. The projects in her lab explore how fundamental ecological mechanisms, e.g. life history characteristics, population dynamics and structure, behavior, physiology, trophic linkages, influence population vulnerability in response to direct and indirect effects of human activities. Lewison has been spearheading integrative and multidisciplinary research within San Diego County, the national and international conservation community. Her research program continues to be recognized by the national and international scientific community. Collaborations within the SDSU community, local scientists and agencies and with the international community are a hallmark of her scholarship.
rlewison@sciences.sdsu.edu
http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/Pub/lewison/conservation/
Erin Marnocha
Erin Marnocha
Dr. Marnocha is a postdoctoral research fellow at the IEMM, where she is working on a collaborative project to develop and implement multi-species monitoring and management programs throughout San Diego County. She received a B.A. in Environmental Studies from Washington University in St. Louis and a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Her dissertation research examined impacts of anthropogenic habitat alteration on morphological variation in the brown anole (Anolis sagrei) and the evolutionary processes underlying those patterns of variation. In recent years, she has been involved in a number of projects in the Ventura River Watershed related to wetland and riparian habitat restoration. She also has experience in molecular ecology, wildlife rehabilitation, project management, and environmental education.
emarnocha@projects.sdsu.edu
Daniel Marschalek
Dan Marschalek
Dr. Daniel Marschalek is a postdoctoral researcher at the IEMM. He has a BS in Entomology and Wildlife Ecology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a MS in Biology (Ecology) from San Diego State University, and a PhD in Entomology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Marschalek’s research interests include ecological research designed to answer questions important to management and conservation of native species. Most of his work has focused on butterflies and skippers, but has extended to other insects and birds, specifically, Hermes copper butterfly, Harbison’s dun skipper, blister beetles, and California least terns. Standardized transects, mark-release-recapture, and population genetic techniques have been implemented to address ecological questions such as distribution, population size, and dispersal.
dmarschalek@projects.sdsu.edu
Patrick McIntyre
Patrick McIntyre
Patrick McIntyre is interested in understanding how to manage ecosystems and species in a changing world. His dissertation research focused on the ecological and evolutionary factors responsible for the geographic ranges of plants, and whether genome duplication in plants might facilitate adaptation to a broad range of environments. He is currently testing the accuracy and usefulness of distribution models for rare plants in the California deserts. He has worked in diverse conservation settings, including the National Park Service, private sector environmental consulting, and conservation advocacy groups.
pmcintyre@projects.sdsu.edu
https://sites.google.com/site/mcintyreecology/
John O'Leary
John O'Leary
Dr. O'Leary continues research begun in 1985 on field sampling of coastal sage scrub and chaparral. In the course of this research, he has also developed teaching and research interests in techniques and issues associated with vegetation mapping. Since 1989 he has served as a principal investigator or co-investigator with other SDSU geography faculty for several vegetation mapping efforts which include: 1) mapping of the vegetation types of Crystal Cove State Park, 2) mapping (in 1992 and 1999) the vegetation and landcover types of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, 3) participating in a comprehensive accuracy assessment of the vegetation-landcover map produced for the Multiple Species Conservation Plan in San Diego county, and 4) directing and participating in the mapping of vegetation and landcover types within the Tijuana River watershed. He has also served as the PI of three contracts dealing with the Long-term Ecosystem Monitoring of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar beginning in 1993 when 65 permanent vegetation plots were established and sampled. The same 65 plots plus 10 additional ones were sampled in 1999, and again (with the addition of seven plots) in spring 2008. Data derived from this long-term study is providing management insights for environmental managers on the facility, and additional ecological insights into the resilience of the various vegetation types to repeated fire and mechanical disturbance.
oleary@mail.sdsu.edu
http://geography.sdsu.edu/People/Faculty/o'leary.html
Doug Stow
Doug Stow
Dr. Douglas Stow is a Professor of Geography at San Diego State University (SDSU) who specializes in remote sensing and image processing. His research focuses on land cover change analyses, particularly for Mediterranean-type and Arctic tundra ecosystems, and major cities of developing countries. He is the primary instructor of remote sensing courses at SDSU and is the Co-Director of the Center for Earth Systems Analysis Research. He has served as adviser for seven doctoral and over 50 master’s degree students. Stow served for almost five years as department chair and is currently the doctoral program coordinator. His research is supported by NASA, National Science Foundation, National Institute of Health, Department of Homeland Security, and state and local agency research grants. He is the author or co-author of over 110 refereed publications and 35 conference proceedings papers, mostly on topics associated with remote sensing for environmental monitoring applications.
stow@mail.sdsu.edu
http://geography.sdsu.edu/People/Faculty/stow.html
Spring Strahm
Spring Strahm
Spring Strahm earned both Bachelors and Masters of Science degrees from San Diego State University, and has been working in Southern California as an ecologist since 1997. Her experience includes restoration ecology, soil chemistry and microbiology, plant ecology, spatial statistics, project management, conservation plan development, reserve management, experimental design and data analysis. Her employment history includes working for a restoration group, for a professional consulting firm and managing one of SDSU' research field stations. She has worked for Dr. Douglas Deutschman, of the IEMM, since 2007 on a variety of projects including: developing sampling methods for coastal sage scrub, chaparral and grasslands, sampling oak woodland demographics and diseases, surveying populations of the rare Hermes copper butterfly, and developing a Dahlem workshop for local conservation stakeholders. Her responsibilities include field work, managing field crews, data analysis and report writing. During her free time Spring enjoys backpacking, "botanizing" in the desert, gardening, snorkeling and sailing a catamaran with her husband.
sstrahm@sciences.sdsu.edu
Catherine Tredick
Catherine Tredick
Dr. Tredick is a postdoctoral research fellow at the IEMM. She has a BS in biology from Duke University and a MS and PhD in wildlife science from Virginia Tech. Her research interests focus on the integration of field-based research, spatial and quantitative analysis, and social science research to answer questions related to wildlife conservation and the response of wildlife to habitat fragmentation and landscape change. Her dissertation work focused on evaluating changes in black bear movement patterns and habitat use in response to a large-scale restoration effort, and how these changes might impact bear-human interactions. This research also aimed to assess factors that predict stakeholder acceptance capacity for bears. Dr. Tredick' MS work involved using noninvasive genetic techniques to estimate population size and genetic structure of bear populations. Her research has always involved close collaboration with federal, state, and tribal wildlife management agencies, other researchers, conservationists, hunters, and other relevant stakeholder groups.
ctredick@projects.sdsu.edu