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Institute for Ecological Monitoring and Management People/Affiliated Scientists and Staff page

Affiliated Scientists and Staff

An, Li Biggs, Trent Bohonak, Andrew Clark, Rulon
Crooks, Jeff Flores-Renteria, Lluvia Gersberg, Richard Haeuser, Emily
Hoh, Eunha Jankowski, Piotr Jennings, Megan Kinoshita, Alicia
Lewison, Rebecca Marschalek, Dan Ryan, Sherry Stow, Doug

Li An
Li An
Li An is Associate Professor at Department of Geography and Adjunct Professor at Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences (RCEES), Chinese Academy of Sciences. He received his B.S from Peking University in 1989, M.S. from Chinese Academy of Sciences (Systems Ecology; 1992) and Michigan State University (Statistics; 2002), and Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 2003. With research interests in space-time analysis and landscape modeling, GeoComputation, landscape ecology, and complexity theory, An published his research in prestigious journals such as Annals of Association of American Geographers (flagship journal in geography), Ecological Modeling, Ecological Economics, and Science. He was the recipient of the 2006 Outstanding Paper in Landscape Ecology from the USA Chapter of the International Association of Landscape Ecologists. His research projects range from local to global (e.g., Nepal, Ghana, USA, and China) scales. An has recently established a research-education-outreach partnership with RCEES of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve (China), and the Zoological Society of San Diego. His research projects have been reported by SDSU Website (front page) and The 360 Magazine (The Magazine of San Diego State University). His service at SDSU includes paper reviews for journals in geography and related disciplines, grant proposal reviews for federal agencies such as NSF, and mentoring of Ph.D. students and M.S./M.A. students
lan@sdsu.edu
http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~lian/projects.html
Trent Biggs
Trent Biggs
Dr. Biggs examines the impacts of land use on watershed processes. His projects include assessing the impact of urbanization on erosion in Tijuana, the effect of irrigation on climate and downstream water scarcity in India, and the impact of climate change on high altitude wetlands in the Himalaya. He has supervised students doing research on snowmelt runoff production in the Sierra Nevada, copper contamination in San Diego marinas, and sedimentation rates in the Tijuana Estuary.
tbiggs@sdsu.edu
https://geography.sdsu.edu/people/tbiggs
Andrew Bohonak
Andrew Bohonak
Dr. Bohonak is an Associate Professor, Director of Undergraduate Advising and Curriculum, and Vice Chair in the Department of Biology. His taxonomic specialty is freshwater crustaceans and insects, and he has conducted research on the endangered San Diego fairy shrimp. He has collaborated with Dr. Ellen Bauder on a guidebook for rapid assessment of vernal pools in San Diego County. He also has expertise in evolutionary biology and population genetics, and has studied patterns of genetic variation in numerous species that are of concern for conservation or management. He has worked with local consulting firms, the City of San Diego, and USFWS on a number of projects related to vernal pools. He serves as a scientific advisor to the San Diego Tracking Team.
abohonak@sdsu.edu
http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/pub/andy/
Rulon Clark
Rulon Clark
Dr. Clark’s primary interests are in understanding how the behavior of individual animals mediate population and community processes. This work is often done in the context of conservation and management of threatened species. His current projects include examining the impacts of habitat fragmentation by human developments on the movement, dispersal, diversity, and connectedness of a suite of terrestrial animal species in the San Diego area (primarily amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals). He uses a combination of ecological monitoring, behavioral research, molecular genetics, and stable isotope analysis to examine ecological and behavioral processes in these communities. Graduate students in Dr. Clark’s laboratory work on similar issues, including the conservation of the San Diego fairy shrimp (Branchinecta sandiegonensis), and the management and reintroduction of the endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa).
rclark@sdsu.edu
http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/pub/clark/Site/Home.html
Jeff Crooks
Jeff Crooks
Jeff Crooks has been working in San Diego’s coastal environments for over 20 years, first as a graduate student and currently as the Research Coordinator of the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (TRNERR). Dr. Crooks work has focused on human-induced changes to the region’s bays and estuaries, as well as restoration of these vital ecosystems. A central problem in trying to understand, protect, and restore natural ecosystems is the realization that many changes in these areas tend to go unnoticed. This results in the phenomenon of "shifting baselines," where expectations of nature are progressively lowered. One way to counter this process is to learn as much as we can about ecosystems of the past, and the TRNERR research program has been examining the historical ecology of our coastal wetlands. Implementing long-term monitoring also helps counteract the shifting of baselines. To that end, Dr. Crooks currently leads a program that tracks short-term variability and long-term change in both physical and biological properties in several coastal wetlands (including the TRNERR, South San Diego Bay, and Los Penasquitos Lagoon). Data gathered from monitoring and research also can be coupled with management efforts in order to learn lessons and improve the efficacy of these actions. The TRNERR adaptive management program focuses on the ecology and control of invasive species, as well as reconstruction and restoration of coastal salt marshes.
jcrooks@trnerr.org
http://trnerr.org/
Lluvia Flores-Renteria
Lluvia Flores-Renteria
Dr. Lluvia Flores-Renteria is an evolutionary ecologist interested in phylogenetics, population genetics, evolution of reproductive systems, and the evolutionary ecology of plant-insect-microbe interactions under climate change. Using greenhouse experiments, common garden studies, field experiments and next generation sequencing technologies, Dr. Flores-Renteria studies the genetic and environmental contributions to drought resistance in plants and the interplay between the responses of different plant genotypes and species and their associated microbes and insects to the stresses of climate change. In her research Dr. Flores-Renteria combines phylogenetics, molecular genetics, epigenetics, population genetics, physiological, morphological, developmental and ecological approaches.
lfloresrenteria@sdsu.edu
https://lluviafloresr.wixsite.com/lluviafloreslab
Richard M. Gersberg
Richard Gersberg
Dr. Richard M. Gersberg is currently a Professor (and Head of the Division) of Environmental Health in the Graduate School of Public Health at San Diego State University (SDSU). He has an M.S. degree in biology, and a Ph.D degree in microbiology from the University of California, Davis. Dr. Gersberg specializes in water quality research, and has broad experience working with both chemical and microbiological pollutants and ecological and human health risk assessments. He has over 60 scientific publications in these areas. Dr. Gersberg has conducted a number of studies on the detection, quantitation, and risk posed by pathogens and chemicals in receiving waters, estuaries and the ocean, including the Tijuana Estuary, the Venice Lagoon, Italy, and the Salton Sea, CA. He is currently the Principal Investigator of a number of water-quality related projects including: the removal and ecotoxicity of selenium in constructed wetlands in Imperial Valley, CA, the effect of sea-level rise on coastal wetland habitats and water quality in San Diego County, and a risk assessment for the consumption of fish from Imperial Beach, CA.
rgersber@sdsu.edu
https://publichealth.sdsu.edu/people/richard-gersberg/
Emily Haeuser
Emily Haeuser
Dr. Emily Haeuser's research interests broadly lie in understanding the effects of climate and land use change on landscape-scale ecological processes, as a means for informing regulation and landscape management decisions. To these ends, she has employed via a variety of observational, experimental and modeling techniques, across multiple systems. During her Master’s at Washington State University, Dr. Haeuser studied spatiotemporal patterns of conifer encroachment into a fire-suppressed shrub-steppe habitat in North-Central Washington state. During her PhD at the University of Konstanz in Germany, Dr. Haeuser used experimental and modeling methods to project shifts in the invasion potential of common alien garden plants in Europe under climate change.

In her current position at San Diego State University and with the Institute for Ecological Monitoring and Management, Dr. Haeuser is using combined distribution, connectivity and demographic modeling to project habitat connectivity resiliency in California’s south coast ecoregion under climate change and land use change. The aim of this project, led by Drs. Megan Jennings and Erin Conlisk and with support from the Wildlife Conservation Board and a State Wildlife Grant, is to identify and prioritize climate change-resilient habitat corridors in the region, so as to inform conservation planning and biodiversity management.
ehaeuser@sdsu.edu
http://www.conservationecologylab.com/emily-haeuser.html
Eunha Hoh
Eunha Hoh
Dr. Eunha Hoh is Assistant Professor in Environmental Health Division of Graduate School of Public Health at SDSU. Dr. Eunha Hoh' research interests focus on fates of diverse environmental pollutants in the environment, identification of new emerging contaminants in the environment, and their impact on human health and ecotoxicology. Analytes of interest are known toxic organic pollutants such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as potentially toxic brominated/chlorinated flame retardants, their degradation products, and other emerging contaminants. Dr. Hoh recently developed an untargeted analytical approach for detection of a broad range of organic chemicals in environmental samples using a comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatograph with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS). She is working on further development of this untargeted analytical approach and its application towards various types of samples for environment monitoring, ecotoxicology and human health. Most of her work involves the application of chromatography and mass spectrometry.
ehoh@sdsu.edu
https://publichealth.sdsu.edu/people/eunha-hoh/
Piotr Jankowski
Piotr Jankowski
Piotr Jankowski received M.S. in Econometrics and Operations Research from the Poznan University of Economics in 1979 and Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Washington in 1989. Before coming to San Diego State University he held faculty appointments in Geography at the University of Idaho and in Geoinformatics at Muenster University in Germany. Since 2003 he has been a professor in the Department of Geography at San Diego State University. His research focuses on Spatial Decision Support Systems, Participatory Geographic Information Systems, Spatial Optimization and Exploratory Data Analysis. He has published extensively in leading Geography and GIScience journals and has been the PI and Co-PI on a number of research projects funded by NSF, NASA, and various state agencies. Some of his past projects include: “Target Mapping System for Spatial Data Mining and Visualization”, “A Border Security Decision Support System Driven by Remotely Sensed Data Inputs”, “An Internet Platform to Support Public Participation in Transportation Decision Making”, “A study of Geographic Information Technology Use in Collaborative Water Resource Planning”. His new book “GIS for Urban and Regional Environments: A Spatial Decision Support Approach”, co-authored with Timothy Nyerges from University of Washington was recently published by Guilford Press.
pjankows@sdsu.edu
https://geography.sdsu.edu/people/piotr
Megan Jennings
Megan Jennings
Dr. Jennings is the Co-Director for the IEMM. She holds a B.A. in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology from Dartmouth College and received her Ph.D. in Ecology in 2013 through a joint program with San Diego State University and University of California, Davis. Her dissertation work focused on examining mammalian carnivore response to fire and shifting fire frequencies in southern California. Her research interests include applied conservation in terrestrial systems, especially landscape connectivity assessments using field, lab-based, and analytical techniques with a goal of providing research to inform land management and conservation planning. She is currently working on a project to assess current and future landscape connectivity across San Diego’s Multiple Species Conservation Plan preserve network using bobcats as an indicator species. This work combines telemetry, remote camera, roadkill, and genetic datasets to evaluate actual movement through the preserve network, and to project what future connectivity will look like given landscape changes resulting from climate change, land-use change, and shifting fire regimes.
mjennings@sdsu.edu
http://www.conservationecologylab.com/megan-jennings.html
Alicia Kinoshita
Alicia Kinoshita
Dr. Alicia Kinoshita investigates the disturbance of natural watershed processes to improve the prediction and management of hydrologic fluxes. She incorporates field data, remote sensing products, and modeling to evaluate the response and recovery of impacted watersheds. Her research primarily focuses on post-fire hydrology water quality, vegetation recovery, and long-term flow regimes.
akinoshita@sdsu.edu
http://akinoshita.weebly.com/
Rebecca Lewison
Rebecca Lewison
Rebecca Lewison is a Professor in the Biology Department and serves as the Director for the IEMM. As a conservation ecologist, Dr. Lewison has research experience on a wide range of species and natural systems. Her research, grounded in conservation science and ecology, employs field, lab-based, analytical and quantitative approaches to address applied questions in resource management and conservation. The projects in her lab explore how fundamental ecological mechanisms, e.g. life history characteristics, population dynamics and structure, behavior, physiology, trophic linkages, influence population vulnerability in response to direct and indirect effects of human activities. Lewison has been spearheading integrative and multidisciplinary research within San Diego County, the national and international conservation community. Her research program continues to be recognized by the national and international scientific community. Collaborations within the SDSU community, local scientists and agencies and with the international community are a hallmark of her scholarship.
rlewison@sdsu.edu
http://www.conservationecologylab.com/
Daniel Marschalek
Dan Marschalek
Dr. Daniel Marschalek is a postdoctoral researcher at the IEMM. He has a BS in Entomology and Wildlife Ecology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a MS in Biology (Ecology) from San Diego State University, and a PhD in Entomology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Marschalek’s research interests include ecological research designed to answer questions important to management and conservation of native species. Most of his work has focused on butterflies and skippers, but has extended to other insects and birds, specifically, Hermes copper butterfly, Harbison’s dun skipper, blister beetles, and California least terns. Standardized transects, mark-release-recapture, and population genetic techniques have been implemented to address ecological questions such as distribution, population size, and dispersal.
dmarschalek@sdsu.edu
http://deutschmanlab.sdsu.edu/people.html
Sherry Ryan
Sherry Ryan
Dr. Sherry Ryan is a Professor in City Planning and the Director of the School of Public Affairs. She earned her undergraduate degree in Romance Languages and Latin American Studies at Princeton University, and an M.S. in Civil Engineering and a Ph.D. in Transportation Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests are focused on understanding transportation–land use interactions, and the influence of land use patterns on travel behavior, physical activity, and health. She has published research in several scholarly journals, including Urban Studies, the Journal of Planning Education and Research, Transportation Research, and the Journal of Physical Activity & Health. She is currently a co-investigator on three research projects funded by the California Department of Transportation and the National Institute of Health.
sryan@sdsu.edu
https://spa.sdsu.edu/index.php/faculty/profile/sherry-ryan
Doug Stow
Doug Stow
Dr. Douglas Stow is a Professor of Geography at San Diego State University (SDSU) who specializes in remote sensing and image processing. His research focuses on land cover change analyses, particularly for Mediterranean-type and Arctic tundra ecosystems, and major cities of developing countries. He is the primary instructor of remote sensing courses at SDSU and is the Co-Director of the Center for Earth Systems Analysis Research. He has served as adviser for seven doctoral and over 50 master’s degree students. Stow served for almost five years as department chair and is currently the doctoral program coordinator. His research is supported by NASA, National Science Foundation, National Institute of Health, Department of Homeland Security, and state and local agency research grants. He is the author or co-author of over 110 refereed publications and 35 conference proceedings papers, mostly on topics associated with remote sensing for environmental monitoring applications.
stow@sdsu.edu
https://geography.sdsu.edu/people/dstow